SATNET Blog

18 Feb 2015

The gains of technology transfer have not reached all farmers, while productivity growth is declining. The excessive use of pesticides and fertilizers has brought into question the long-term sustainability of Asia-Pacific agricultural production systems. There is also a lack of evidence of what works for smallholders and how the successful use of improved technology can be scaled up. There is, therefore, a need for improved documentation and data management to inform policymaking in support of technology transfer to promote sustainable agriculture, food security and poverty reduction.

18 Feb 2015

Dr. Hannah Jaenicke, Consultant, Project Management and Evaluation, in her presentation to the Policy Dialogue reviewed data and methodological issues in evaluating the role of knowledge networks in technology transfer.

16 Feb 2015

In the afternoon of the first day of the CAPSA Policy Dialogue, participants learned about recent successful attempts to develop an institutional regulatory framework for fisheries in Myanmar’s Ayeyarwaddy Delta region.

16 Feb 2015

Mr. Pushpa Raj Rajkarnikar, Chairman, Institute for Policy Research and Development of Nepal, made a presentation to the Third SATNET Policy Dialogue on the problems and potential of agricultural trade in Nepal. The country can export a variety of agricultural and processed food products such as large cardamom, ginger, honey, lentils, tea, medicinal herbs, essential oils and instant noodles, but faces a number of trade constraints.

16 Feb 2015

In his presentation to the Policy Dialogue, Mr. Komal Pradhan, National Program Director, International Development Enterprises (iDE), Nepal, explained how local farmer organizations are strengthen marketing of agricultural produce by small and marginal farmers in in Nepal. Besides limited marketing opportunities, major constraints to commercial sale of their produce, include the subsistence-oriented nature of local agriculture, farmers’ lack of knowledge, training and skills, difficulty in accessing agricultural inputs from distant district capitals and major towns, and the limited price negotiating ability of farmers.